Tom Bradley (text) + Nick Patterson (art)

Tom Bradley taught British and American literature to Chinese graduate students in the years leading up to the Tiananmen Square massacre. He was politely invited to leave China after burning a batch of student essays about the democracy movement rather than surrendering them to “the leaders.” He wound up teaching conversational skills to freshman dentistry majors in the Japanese “imperial university.” Tom is a former lounge harpist. During his pre-exilic period, he played his own transcriptions of Bach and Debussy in a Salt Lake City synagogue that had been transformed into a pricey watering hole by a nephew of the Shah of Iran. Family Romance is Tom’s twentieth published book

Nick Patterson is a visual artist whose love of twisting minds and turning heads has lead him to explore all the darkness the human experience can muster, through high contrast ink drawings. With no official training in the visual medium, Patterson’s art is loosely tethered to reality, although it is very detailed. His inspiration is drawn from an amalgam of cartoons, comics, and movies. Carrying a sketchbook with him everywhere, he lets no flicker of imagination escape. Nick Patterson’s art has been published in several small magazines and novels. He currently lives in a city full of flowers on the western edge of Canada.
Tom Bradley (text) + Nick Patterson (art) Profile
“exasperating, offensive, pleasurable, and brilliant…it might well be genius”
Family Romance a novel by nick patterson (visuals)and tom bradley (verbals)
SOUND: TBA

“It’s a monstrosity of the imagination as if a Burroughs virus hijacked the machinery of Finnigans Wake and replicated itself as a litera-teratus. Illustrator Nick Patterson joins Bradley in the procedure with ninety disturbing images of Bosch-like detail you don’t want to see on the way home from your local head shop.” —by John Ivan-Palmer, Exquisite Corpse

“Tom Bradley is one of the most exasperating, offensive, pleasurable, and brilliant writers I know. I recommend his work to anyone with spiritual fortitude and a taste for something so strange that it might well be genius.”
—Denis Dutton, Arts & Letters Daily

“I tell you that Dr. Bradley has devoted his existence to writing because he intends for every center of consciousness, everywhere, in all planes and conditions (not just terrestrial female Homo sapiens in breeding prime), to love him forever,
starting as soon as possible, though he’s prepared to wait thousands of centuries after he’s dead.” —Cye Johan, Exquisite Corpse Journal

“The contemporaries of Michelangelo found it useful to employ the term ‘terribilita’ to characterize some of the expressions of his genius, and I will quote it here to sum up the shocking impact of this work as a whole. I read it in a state of fascination, admiration, awe, anxiety, and outrage.” – R.V. Cassill, editor of The Norton Anthology of Fiction